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1. CABINETRY:

Although there are many finishes for cabinetry on the outside, the inside of any cabinet will always be White Melamine. This is referred to as the “carcass”. White Melamine is basically compacted chipboard shavings and also the industry standard for carcasses.

The outside components like doors etc; are manufactured from Supawood with different finishes/profiles. Supawood is a much denser compact of chipboard and is also considered an industry standard for “viewable” cabinetry. (The only exception to Supawood as the base of viewable components would be if you’ve selected solid wood components for your cabinetry.)

Below you will see a diagram labelling most of the components you may hear about while looking at new cabinetry:

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New Line Kitchens - Kitchen Designs - Kitchen Cabinetry

The finishes/profiles of your cabinetry are chiefly determined by the type of overall style you choose, but let’s first take a look at the main finishes available from the most expensive to the least expensive (please note: any pricing quoted are considered rough estimates and subject to change):

  • Solid Wood Components: Due to the nature of wood, only certain components in your cabinetry will be solid wood. You will also be limited with your choice of door profiles. (We’ll get to those later; we would only recommend the ‘Rail and Stile’ profile in order to prevent warping.) Solid wood is also the most expensive material on the market at around R p/m².
  • Duco Spray in High Gloss:  For this finish; duco paint gets sprayed onto Supawood and polished to a high-gloss finish. Although it’s expensive at around R1155.00 p/m², duco has virtually unlimited colour options.
  • Veneer: Is very simply a very thin layer of real wood that’s heated and pressure laminated onto a Supawood base. Veneer will cost you around R950 p/m². This finish is a great substitute for the solid wood look without the high cost.
  • PVC Wrap in High Gloss: This is about 1mm layer of high gloss PVC (either wood grain or colour) that’s heated and vacuum laminated onto Supawood and it will cost you around R1129.00 p/m². There is a medium selection of colours/finishes.
  • Duco Spray in Satin finish: This is made exactly the same way as its high-gloss counterpart; however it’s not polished to a gloss finish. This option comes in at roughly R908.00 p/m².
  • PVC Wrap: Again, this is also made the same way as its high gloss cousin, however the PVC laminates do not have a glossy finish and the cost is also less at around R660.00 p/m².
  • Melamine: This finish is basically a durable paper print (either wood grain or colour) that’s glued onto Melamine. This is the least expensive option available at roughly R360.00 p/m² and there are a number of colours/finishes to choose from.

Now, let’s look at how the finishes fit in with the different styles available. There are 4 main styles of cabinetry namely; Antique, Classic, Contemporary and Modern.

  • Antique: The Antique effect is very uniquely achieved by using only the Duco Spray in Satin finish and using a hand-painted technique on top of it. At roughly R1000 p/m², this is the most expensive style available.
  • Classic: The Classic style can be achieved either by using Duco Spray in Satin finish, Veneer or Solid Wood components. By changing your door profile, light-shield and capping/top fillers you can also adjust the style to better suit your taste.
  • Contemporary: The Contemporary style can be achieved using Duco Spray in Satin or High Gloss finishes, PVC Wrap or Solid Wood components.
  • Modern: A Modern style can be achieved by using Duco Spray in Satin or High Gloss finishes, PVC Wrap in Standard or High Gloss finish, Veneer or Melamine.

2. DOOR PROFILES:

The door profile refers to the “pattern” or finish on the doors. There are quite a few to choose from; below are six examples of the most popular ones available for PVC Wrap:

New Line Kitchens - Kitchen Designs - Door Profiles

New Line Kitchens - Kitchen Designs - Door Profiles

  • *The V-Grove profile can be horizontal or vertical.
  • The ‘Rail & Stile’ Profile as specified earlier is the only one recommended for use with Solid Wood components. The ‘rails’ are the horizontal panels and the ‘stiles’ refer to the vertical panels. These Solid wood components are then used in conjunction with a Veneer Fielded (sunken) panel in the middle. The end result looks like the Shaker profile.

3. KICKPLATES:

Kickplates or Plinths as they’re often referred to are the narrow panels that lay horizontally between the floor and the bottom of the cabinets. Cabinets are almost never built directly onto the floor in order to protect them from moisture.

You can make use of Stainless Steel, Aluminium Resin type Kickplates or alternatively; the Kickplates can be made to match the rest of your cabinetry. This is normally what’s done with Bedroom BIC’s. The other option, usually used or combined for Bathroom vanities is to either have floating cabinetry which doesn’t require any Kickplates at all – Cabinetry is supported by wall mountings, or by using cabinet legs.

 

4. COUNTERTOPS:

Countertops can sometimes be the most difficult product to choose as there are so many options available and the Countertop is more often than not, also one of the components subject to the most wear and tear in any environment.

There are 5 main types of Countertops which we’ll examine in a little more detail below. Again, for convenience sake, they have been arranged from the most expensive to the least expensive:

  1. Manufactured Stone: There are quite a few options when looking at manufactured stone. We’ll only address the most popular ones below. The more expensive types (Hanstone, Ceasarstone, Cimstone and Technistone) start at around R4500 p/m² while the cheaper types (Corian & Montelli) start at around R3000 p/m²:
    1. Hanstone, Ceasarstone, Cimstone and Technistone – are all licensed brands of Breton selling the same product. Using over 90% Quartz in conjunction with high-quality polymer resins and pigments that are compacted under intense vibration, vacuum, and pressure into dense, non-porous slabs. The only differences between the brands will be colours or styles available and their pricing. Of the four; Technistone is the most expensive, Ceasarstone and Cimstone follow and the least expensive of the four is Hanstone.
    2. Corian & Montelli – Again, both these are simply different brands referring to the same product manufactured by Dupont. These sustainable or “Green” solid surfaces are created by casting and thermo-heating recycled Acrylic Polymer and Alumina Trihydrate together. These tops are also non-porous making them hygienic and easy to clean. Although these solid surfaces are not as strong or resistant to damage as granite or manufactured stone; stains, burns and scratches can be carefully buffed away to restore the surface. There are many colours to choose from and of the two, Montelli is the least expensive.
  2. Stainless Steel: Stainless Steel is probably the most hygienic top you can invest in, and although scratches and dents are easily made, this is the only top besides wood that actually looks better with more abuse. Buffing can also help with minimizing scratches and making the top look more even.  S/Steel is quite expensive and can start at a minimum of R3000 p/m²
  3. Solid Wood: There are two options when looking at Solid Wood Countertops. Both start at around R3000 p/m²:
    1. Bamboo – Bamboo is by far the hardest wearing ‘wood’ you can use for a countertop but the colour/shade selection is also fairly limited.  If the very distinct horizontal grain of Bamboo is not exactly your taste; you can select the grain to be layered vertically so you’re still getting the strength of Bamboo with a more natural wood look.
    2. Solid Wood – Although there is no denying that Solid Wood looks great, it is probably one of the softest surfaces and the most easily damaged. In its defence, wood can also be repaired the easiest. A simple sanding and treatment can have the surface looking as good as new.
  4. Natural Stone: It does come as a surprise to most people that natural stone is cheaper than the manufactured types and both Marble and Granite start out at around R1800 p/m²:
    1. Marble – Metamorphic Rock. Because Marble is a natural product there are not a lot of colours/variations to choose from, it is extremely porous and it’s also one of the softest surfaces as far as stone goes.
    2. Granite – Igneous Rock. Granite has more colour/variations to choose from than Marble, but still not as many as manufactured types. It is also far harder than Marble and virtually non-porous if sealed correctly.
  5. Postform: This high pressure laminate is constructed from surface layers of melamine resin paper that are pressed simultaneously under high pressure and heated. Postform does unfortunately scratch and stain quite easily if you don’t take care. It is also porous which means it does need to be regularly cleaned correctly to avoid the spread of germs and bacteria. There are numerous colours, wood grains and textures available in Postform and at around R500 p/m² it is also the cheapest countertop option on the market.
The four most important things to consider whenever deciding on any countertop are:
  • Picking any natural product (Wood or Stone) means that there will always be a variance in colour and structure in the end product.
  • No surface will ever be completely damage proof. Some may be more resistant to scratching or damage than others but all are susceptible to the elements and uses we subject them to over time.
  • Some surfaces like Stainless Steel and Wood, although easily damaged do tend to improve their looks with wear and age.
  • Does the top fit with the overall style and functionality of your Kitchen, Bedroom or Bathroom?

5. HANDLES:

This component is normally the last one chosen and is determined by the overall style of your cabinetry. There are colours and sizes available in just about every material including plastics, wood, aluminium, crystal, porcelain or s/steel to fit any style of cabinet available.

  • The most expensive type of handles/knobs are the specialized (imported) and crystal knobs which can range from R51-300ea.
  • Stainless Steel handles can also reach up to R300ea depending on the type and size. (The longer the handle the more expensive it tends to become.)
  • The majority of handles/knobs are in the R26-R50ea category which leaves a large variety well within most people’s budget.
  • The cheapest types of handles/knobs are the smaller sizes, generic plastic and wooden variety that range anywhere from between R10-R25ea.
  • Our advice to you for picking your handles or knobs is to 1st keep in mind your overall style and then your budget; this will keep your options within a more manageable range of choices.